“The Unrighteous Shall Not Inherit the Kingdom of God” – Explained! – Once Saved.org
 

“The Unrighteous Shall Not Inherit the Kingdom of God” – Explained!

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In this video, we’re going to examine 1 Corinthians 6 and Galatians 5 where Paul speaks about how the unrighteous – those who are fornicators, idolators, adulterers, or have other sins – shall not inherit the Kingdom of God. Paul is very clear on this, that no one with any of those sins will be saved. What do these verses mean for believers in Christ? Unfortunately, these verses have been misused by many who do not believe in eternal security to supposedly prove that it’s possible to lose your salvation, that through sinning, a believer can cause God to revoke their salvation. In other words, they can lose it. After all, the unrighteous shall not inherit the Kingdom of God, so if a believer acts unrighteously, he or she shall not be saved. Is that what these verses mean for a believer in Christ? Nope. Not at all. In fact, Paul is saying the exact opposite. Instead of warning us that we could lose our salvation, he gives us a message in each letter of our eternal security in Christ. Let’s look into it.

Here is the first passage from 1 Corinthians chapter 6:9-10.

Know ye not that the unrighteous shall not inherit the Kingdom of God? Be not deceived: neither fornicators, nor idolaters, nor adulterers, nor effeminate, nor abusers of themselves with mankind, nor thieves, nor covetous, nor drunkards, nor revilers, nor extortioners, shall inherit the Kingdom of God.” (1 Corinthians 6:9-10 KJV)

Then there is the passage from Galatians 5:19-20, which is very similar:

“Now the works of the flesh are manifest, which are these; Adultery, fornication, uncleanness, lasciviousness, idolatry, witchcraft, hatred, variance, emulations, wrath, strife, seditions, heresies, envyings, murders, drunkenness, revellings, and such like: of the which I tell you before, as I have also told you in time past, that they which do such things shall not inherit the Kingdom of God.” (Galatians 5:19-21 KJV)

These verses could not be any clearer. There is no gray area or wiggle room here. Paul is very explicit, saying that the unrighteous, those who do such things, shall not inherit the Kingdom of God. They shall not be saved. So, what does this mean to a saved believer? Aren’t these verses clearly saying that a believer who does such things will not be saved? It looks pretty clear, doesn’t it?

Well, that’s that problem with taking verses in isolation and not connecting them to the verses around them: You can be led off into error, in a direction the author never intended. And that’s the case here, if you think these verses are saying you can lose your salvation. 

So, let’s get to the real meaning of these verses by looking at them in context. Let’s start with 1 Corinthians chapter 6 and understand what Paul is really saying. Then let’s look at Galatians chapter 5, where I’ll show you that Paul is saying the exact same thing. And in no way is he saying that it’s possible to lose salvation. In fact, Paul gives us a clear message of eternal security in Christ, that you can never lose your salvation.

 In 1 Corinthians chapter 6, let’s look at verses 9-12 to put the scary verses, verses 9 and 10, in context. In this passage, Paul tells the Corinthians 3 main things, beginning with verses 9-10.

Know ye not that the unrighteous shall not inherit the Kingdom of God? Be not deceived: neither fornicators, nor idolaters, nor adulterers, nor effeminate, nor abusers of themselves with mankind, nor thieves, nor covetous, nor drunkards, nor revilers, nor extortioners, shall inherit the Kingdom of God.” (1 Corinthians 6:9-10 KJV)

The first thing Paul tells them is this:

1. The unrighteous will not inherit the Kingdom.

Paul lists a number of sins in these verses as examples of egregious sins. But we know from Scripture that really any sin, even just one sin, can separate us from God. For James 2:10 says,

“For whosoever shall keep the whole law, and yet offend in one point, he is guilty of all.” (James 2:10 KJV)

In other words, it only takes one sin to become a sinner before God. We know that God is perfectly holy, and He will never allow even one sin into His perfect presence. Paul’s message is that anyone who is unrighteous will not inherit the Kingdom. You can’t go, “Well, I sinned over here, but my sin isn’t on the specific list of sins that Paul gave, so I’m ok.” No. If you didn’t commit adultery but you sinned somewhere else, you are still a sinner before God. And the unrighteous shall not inherit the Kingdom. God’s standard is His own total perfection.

Now, if that chapter ended right there, we would all be in trouble and perhaps those who say you can lose your salvation would be right. But the chapter doesn’t end there. 

Paul goes on in verse 11:

“And such were some of you: but ye ARE washed, but ye ARE sanctified, but ye ARE justified in the Name of the Lord Jesus, and by the Spirit of our God.” (1 Corinthians 6:11 KJV)

Paul says, “such were some of you,” past tense and speaking to believers. Paul is telling believers, “You were like that, in bondage to sin and under condemnation before God, but you are not like that anymore.” Instead, Paul says, “You ARE washed, you ARE sanctified, you ARE justified in the Name of the Lord Jesus, and by the Holy Spirit.” Notice that these words – “washed,” “sanctified,” “justified” – are in the present tense. Paul didn’t say, “You WERE washed, sanctified, justified in the past.” The Greek tense here defines a present and ongoing event. In other words, our washing, our sanctification, our justification is an ever-present event that is forever ongoing. No matter how far out into the future you go, you ARE washed, you ARE sanctified, you ARE justified. It’s ongoing and always present.

There are those who believe that when you place your faith in Christ, only your past sins are forgiven. I’ve done videos on this to show how incorrect that is. If that were true, then Paul should have said, “You WERE washed, sanctified, justified.” But Paul didn’t say that. He used a present tense verb to say that we are forever being washed, sanctified and justified by the blood of Christ and by the Holy Spirit. For that to be true, all sins (past, present and future) have to be forgiven the moment you place your faith in Christ. We ARE washed, ARE sanctified, ARE justified, from the moment we place our faith in Christ throughout all eternity. And Paul was speaking to the Corinthian church where the believers were guilty of many sins. Yet he told them that they ARE washed, ARE sanctified, ARE justified.

This means that when we sin as believers, from a salvation standpoint, the blood of Christ is still operative, it’s still working, to wash away the very sin we just committed. The washing of sin by the blood of Christ never stops. If it never stops, then we can never lose our salvation.

So, what happens when a believer commits adultery? From a salvation standpoint, immediately that sin is washed away, even if we don’t ask for forgiveness, not because of anything we did, but because of what Christ has already done. When Christ said on the cross, “It is finished,” He really meant it. There is no more sacrifice for sin that is needed. 

God will not condemn a believer because of sin. We are forever being washed, sanctified and justified by His blood and by the Holy Spirit. This is also why the Holy Spirit will never leave us. God will still discipline us, so we are not at liberty to sin, and that discipline can be severe, up to the point of ending our physical lives early. But we will not lose salvation on account of sin, because we ARE (present tense) forever being washed, sanctified, justified. Christ has forever set us free from the power and condemnation of sin.

So, the second thing Paul tells the Corinthians is this:

2.
YOU USED TO BE:
In bondage to sin and under condemnation like the rest of the world,
BUT NOW YOU ARE:
Forever washed, sanctified, justified in Christ and by the Holy Spirit.

Because a believer in Christ is always and forever washed, sanctified and justified in Christ, this means that you are forever righteous, not unrighteous, in God’s sight. The unrighteous will not inherit the Kingdom. But in Christ, we are forever righteous in God’s sight.

Hebrews 10:14 and 17 tell us:

“For by one offering He hath perfected for ever them that are sanctified. …And their sins and iniquities will I remember no more.” (Hebrews 10:14, 17 KJV)

The moment you place your faith in Christ, you are sanctified, which means “set apart,” “made holy,” in God’s sight. Notice that it says here that Christ has “perfected forever them that are sanctified.” If Christ has perfected us forever from the moment we place our faith in Him and become sanctified, then we cannot become unclean, unsanctified, unjustified. That means we are forever righteous in God’s sight.

2 Corinthians 5:21 says,

“For He (God the Father) hath made Him (Jesus) to be sin for us, Who knew no sin; that we might be made the righteousness of God in Him (in Christ).” (2 Corinthians 5:21 KJV)

This says Jesus took on our sin (past, present and future) and paid for it all on the cross. In exchange, He gave us His own righteousness. That’s called “imputed righteousness,” righteousness that is not our own but is given to us, imputed to us. Our righteousness is a gift from God, not something we earn through our obedience. Our obedience is merely the outward working of the righteousness God has already given us by His grace through faith in Christ. I did a video on imputed righteousness where I go through this in detail. If you are not familiar with what Scripture teaches on imputed righteousness, I’ll include a link to it at the end of this video.

The point Paul makes is this: Once we are born again through faith in Christ, we stand in His righteousness, not our own. Therefore, from God’s legal perspective, we are forever righteous in His sight. We now stand by faith in the very righteousness of God. 

So, when Paul says, “The unrighteous shall not inherit the Kingdom,” he’s not talking about believers! Because of Christ, God never sees a believer as unrighteous as far as salvation in concerned. Even when we sin, that sin is immediately washed so that we remain sanctified and justified in Christ and by the Holy Spirit. For us to lose God’s righteousness, our righteous standing before God, would mean that the blood of Christ would have to become inoperative in our lives. In other words, Christ’s blood would have to stop working as a perfect sacrifice.

But what did the passage say from Hebrews 10 that we just looked at?

“For by one offering He hath perfected for ever them that are sanctified. …And their sins and iniquities will I remember no more.” (Hebrews 10:14, 17 KJV)

Christ’s blood is the perfect sacrifice for our sins – all of our sins (past, present and future). Therefore, we ARE (in the present tense, forever into the future) washed, sanctified and justified in Christ and by the Holy Spirit. Christ’s perfect sacrifice has made us forever righteous in God’s sight. 

That why Paul said in Philippians 3:9 that his goal in life was to:

“… be found in Him (Christ), not having mine own righteousness, which is of the law, but that which is through the faith of Christ, the righteousness which is of God by faith:” (Philippians 3:9 KJV)

Paul said he was not trying to obey commandments to establish his own righteousness before God. Instead, by faith, he was standing in the very righteousness of God. That applies to all of us who believe in Christ: We no longer stand in our own righteousness, having to prove ourselves worthy before God. We stand by faith in His righteousness. Therefore, our righteousness before God (which is His own righteousness given to us) never ends.

In fact, Paul criticized those who believe you have to obey commandments and laws to prove themselves worthy before God. He said of such people in Romans 10:

“For they being ignorant of God’s righteousness, and going about to establish their own righteousness, have not submitted themselves unto the righteousness of God. For Christ is the end of the law for righteousness to every one that believeth.” (Romans 10:3-4 KJV)

As Christians, we do not have to obey commandments to be saved or to keep our salvation. We do not go about trying to establish our own righteousness before God, which we could never do through our own obedience, because God’s standard is complete perfection. Instead, Paul says Christ is the end of the law, the end of following laws and commandments in order to establish our own righteousness. Christ has already paid our debt of sin before God, giving us His own righteousness, which we stand in by faith. 

This means you are forever righteous, not unrighteous, in God’s sight. Therefore, the verse about how the unrighteous will not inherit the Kingdom, doesn’t apply to anyone who has placed their faith in Christ.

To sum it all up, Paul says in Romans 5:19:

“For as by one man’s disobedience (Adam) many were made sinners, so by the obedience of One (Christ) shall many be made righteous.” (Romans 5:19 KJV)

Your obedience does not make you righteous. Your obedience is an outward sign of the righteousness God has already given you. It is Christ’s obedience that makes us forever righteous.

So, getting back to 1 Corinthians 6 and having said all that about how, because of Christ, we are forever righteous before God, then in verse 12, Paul gets to his main point in telling them that they are free in Christ.

All things are lawful unto me, but all things are not expedient: all things are lawful for me, but I will not be brought under the power of any.” (1 Corinthians 6:12 KJV)

Twice Paul says, “All things are lawful to me.” If all things are lawful to Paul, then there is nothing that is unlawful to Paul, including sin. This does not mean that Paul now has license to sin, for God will still discipline a believer because of sin.

But God will no longer condemn a believer to hell on account of sin because all sin has been forever paid for on the cross. The phrase, “All things are lawful unto me,” means that the law, which convicts a person of sin, no longer has power to condemn. The power of sin to condemn you to hell has been broken forever by Christ. You are forever free. Once you are free in Christ, sin can no longer cause you to be condemned. That’s why Paul said, “There is therefore now no condemnation to them which are in Christ Jesus…” (Romans 8:1 KJV)

Sin, working through the law, can no longer condemn us to hell because all sin is forever covered by the blood of Christ. We are forever being washed, sanctified and justified. Therefore, even when we sin as believers, we will not be condemned. 

Does that mean the previous verse were Paul said “the unrighteous shall not inherit the Kingdom of God” is false? No. Or, as Paul would say, “May it never be.” God’s Word is always true. That verse is correct: the unrighteous shall not inherit the Kingdom of God. What Paul is saying about believers who sin is that, because the blood of Christ is forever operative – always washing, sanctifying and justifying us – any sins we commit as believers never appear on our record. Instead, they are immediately washed away. We ARE continually being cleansed. Therefore, when God goes to judge the unrighteous, there will be no unrighteous sins on our record. They’ve all been washed away. Our record of sin before God is forever being washed clean by the blood of Christ.

That is why Paul says he is free in Christ: “All things are now lawful to me.” 

But then notice that he immediately says, “but I will not be brought under the power of any.” In other words, even though Paul can commit sin and not be condemned to hell, he has determined not to abuse that freedom. In his freedom, he has chosen to not give himself over to sin. He says, “All things are lawful to me, but all things are not expedient.” This word, “expedient,” in the Greek means “to help,” or “to be profitable.” Paul is saying, “Yes, in my freedom, because of what Christ did, I can now sin without being sent to hell, but that would be of no help to me or to God. Sin would not be profitable for me or to God if I live that way. Therefore, I choose not to give myself over to sin.”

So, the third thing Paul tells the Corinthians and us is this:

3. You are free in Christ, so don’t give yourselves to sin anymore.

If you read the first part of chapter 6. the central problem Paul was addressing was that Corinthian believers were defrauding one another and then taking each other to court in front of unbelievers. Paul told them that these unbelievers were so lost that they were on their way to hell (“the unrighteous shall not inherit the Kingdom of God”). So, why have they been going to these unbelievers for justice? Paul asks them why they can’t decide these matters themselves among believers. Then he tells them an even better way, which is to stop defrauding one another altogether and stop giving themselves over to sin.

You are free in Christ, so don’t give yourselves to sin anymore. Don’t allow yourself to come under its power of bondage, under its influences. Don’t act like you are still in bondage to sin like the rest of the world, all of whom will be condemned. You have been saved. The Holy Spirit now dwells in you. You have a power source to say no to sin that you didn’t have before. Don’t be like them anymore. You used to be like that before you were saved, but not anymore, because Christ has forever set you free. Instead, walk in freedom. Walk in holiness, in the Spirit.

So, in 1 Corinthians 6:9-12, Paul tells them three things:

  1. The unrighteous will not inherit the Kingdom.

  2. YOU USED TO BE: In bondage to sin and under condemnation like the rest of the world,
    BUT NOW YOU ARE: Forever washed, sanctified, justified in Christ and by the Holy Spirit.
    MEANING: You are forever righteous, not unrighteous, in God’s sight!


  3. You are free in Christ, so don’t give yourselves to sin anymore.

Can you now see how Paul is not warning the Corinthians or us that we could lose our salvation by sinning? That’s not what this passage means. That kind of teaching is in total error. Paul is saying just the opposite, that we used to be like those who will be condemned because of sin, but now we are free in Christ, forever being washed, sanctified, justified because of what Christ did for us, so let’s not abuse that freedom and give ourselves over to sin anymore.

In Galatians chapter 5, where Paul also states that the unrighteous shall not inherit the Kingdom of God, we find that Paul is telling the Galatians the very same three points. His message is identical. The only difference in Galatians 5 is that Paul makes these same three points in reverse order, starting with point number 3 and working back to point number 1. Let’s show this by looking at Galatians 5:13-21.

Starting with point #3 – You are free in Christ, so don’t give yourselves to sin anymore.

For, brethren, ye have been called unto liberty; only use not liberty for an occasion to the flesh, but by love serve one another. For all the law is fulfilled in one word, even in this; Thou shalt love thy neighbour as thyself. But if ye bite and devour one another, take heed that ye be not consumed one of another.” (Galatians 5:13-15 KJV)

Paul first tells the Galatians that they are free in Christ. He says, “you have been called unto liberty.” What is this liberty? It’s the liberty that sin and the law can no longer condemn you to hell once you are in Christ. The very sins you commit as a Christian have already been paid for on the cross (past, present and future). You are free in Christ from the penalty of sin. If that’s not true, if sin can still send a Christian to hell, then you are not at liberty. But Paul says we have liberty in Christ. That’s why he immediately cautions us to not misuse that liberty, to not use our liberty for an occasion to the flesh. God will still discipline us when we sin, but He will not disown us. He will not revoke our salvation.

This discipline from God is not God punishing believers in Christ in wrath because of our sin. Our sin as believers in Christ has forever been paid for on the cross. Our debt to God has been paid in full. Therefore, when we sin, God does not discipline us as punishment for sin. But what does Scripture say? Hebrews 12:10 says:

“… He disciplines us for our good, so that we may share His holiness.” (Hebrews 12:10 NASB95)

God is going to punish unbelievers for their sin. He’s going to do it in wrath. But for His children who are saved by faith in Christ, He disciplines us for our good that we may share in His holiness.

Therefore, we are free from the penalty of sin, but we also can’t use that freedom to live in sin without consequence. That consequence will be God’s discipline, not loss of salvation. So, the first point Paul makes is that we are free in Christ. 

And then, for point #2 – YOU USED TO BE: In bondage to sin and under condemnation like the rest of the world, BUT NOW YOU ARE: Forever washed, sanctified, justified in Christ and by the Holy Spirit, MEANING: You are forever righteous, not unrighteous, in God’s sight!

To say all this, Paul simply tells them to walk in the Spirit, which means they have the Spirit. They are already righteous in God’s sight. Only people who are washed, sanctified and justified in Christ have the Spirit.

“This I say then, Walk in the Spirit, and ye shall not fulfil the lust of the flesh. For the flesh lusteth against the Spirit, and the Spirit against the flesh: and these are contrary the one to the other: so that ye cannot do the things that ye would. But if ye be led of the Spirit, ye are not under the law.” (Galatians 5:16-18 KJV)

Again, Paul references our freedom in Christ, not being under the law anymore, that no law or commandment can condemn us to hell because we are in Christ. But notice that there’s an “if” in his last statement: “if ye be led of the Spirit, ye are not under the law.” Paul isn’t stating a negative here, that IF you, as a saved believer, do not allow yourself to be led by the Spirit, then you are back under the law and can be condemned. Or, put another way, he’s not saying that you, as a saved believer, are not under the law as long as you allow yourself to be led by the Spirit but, once you stop allowing yourself to be led by the Spirit and partake of sin, then you are back under the law and can be condemned. That’s not what he’s saying. Paul is simply saying that if the Spirit is inside you, leading you (in other words: if you are saved and have been indwelt by the Holy Spirit) you are no longer under the law. The conditional element Paul is bringing up is not about your obedience but about whether you are saved. IF you are saved, IF the Holy Spirit is inside you, leading you, then you are no longer under the law. That’s what the “if” in Paul’s statement means. He’s not talking about your obedience but about whether you are saved.

The mark of every saved believer is that they have the Holy Spirit in them, leading them toward Christ. If the Holy Spirit is truly in you, and He’s there to lead you to Christ, then you are no longer under the law. 

But what if we, as saved believers, don’t allow ourselves to be led by the Spirit but instead walk in sin? Then God will discipline us as His children. But He will not disown us, so we will never lose our salvation, for in Hebrews 13:5, God says, “I will never leave you or forsake you.” So, we have liberty in that sin can no longer condemn us to hell. But that doesn’t give us license to sin, for God will be faithful to discipline His children. Therefore, Paul cautioned the Galatians and us to not use our liberty as an occasion for the flesh but to walk in the Spirit. 

And then, finally, Paul tells them point #1 – The unrighteous will not inherit the Kingdom.

“Now the works of the flesh are manifest, which are these; Adultery, fornication, uncleanness, lasciviousness, Idolatry, witchcraft, hatred, variance, emulations, wrath, strife, seditions, heresies, envyings, murders, drunkenness, revellings, and such like: of the which I tell you before, as I have also told you in time past, that they which do such things shall not inherit the Kingdom of God.” (Galatians 5:19-21 KJV)

Paul told the Galatians the same three points he made to the Corinthians, just in reverse order. He never told them that they could lose their salvation if they go on sinning. He said just the opposite, that all believers are free in Christ. We used to be like the rest of the word, under condemnation and unable to inherit the Kingdom. But in Christ, we are forever free, washed, sanctified, justified. Therefore, use your freedom in Christ to walk in the Spirit.
 
“As far as the east is from the west, so far hath He removed our transgressions from us.” (Psalm 103:12 KJV)
 
In Christ, we have salvation assurance. We can never lose our salvation. We can say as Paul said: “All things are lawful to me. but I will not be brought under the power of any.” Even sin cannot rob us of our salvation in Christ. Sin and the law can no longer condemn us. We are free. But in our freedom, let us not go on living like we did before we were saved, giving ourselves to sin and coming under its bondage. We are free in Christ. Therefore, walk in the Spirit, not in the flesh. You are no longer in the flesh but in the Spirit.
 
That is how we are to live as Christians, not in fear and doubt, being afraid that we might lose our salvation if we sin. We are to walk in confidence that the blood of Christ forever cleanses us from all sin. Jesus has already won the victory for us. As He said, “It is finished.” To Him be ALL the glory. 
 
Therefore, let me conclude with this:

If we are “free in Christ,” then our sin cannot send us to hell because sin has forever been paid for on the cross.

This doesn’t mean we have license to sin. God will still discipline us when we sin. That can include earthly punishment, early death and loss of heavenly rewards, but not the loss of eternal salvation. In Colossians 3:25, God makes it clear that there are still consequences for sin in a believer’s life:

“For he who does wrong will receive the consequences of the wrong which he has done, and that without partiality.” (Colossians 3:25 NASB95)

Paul spoke that to believers, but he never implied that one of the consequences could be loss of salvation. Our salvation is forever secure. But God will discipline us when we sin. There are many believers who have either died early, before their time, or are spending their lives in prison, paying the consequence for what they have done. Sin is never ok. The remedy is to walk in the Spirit and you will not fulfill the lust of the flesh.
 
But let me be even more direct here:
 

If you, as a Christian, believe that your sin, your disobedience, can still send you to hell, then you are NOT believing the Gospelthat Christ really saved you.

You simply do not believe the Word of God, that Christ has set you free, that you now stand in liberty in Christ, if you think that you must earn your own way by your own obedience to commandments and laws to prove yourself worthy of being saved. If that’s you, then you have believed a lie. That’s unbelief in the Gospel. What did Paul say to the Galatians in verse 1 of chapter 5?
 
“Stand fast therefore in the liberty wherewith Christ hath made us free, and be not entangled again with the yoke of bondage.” (Galatians 5:1 KJV)
 
This last phrase, “yoke of bondage,” means believing that your obedience is required for you to be saved instead of trusting completely in Christ. You say you believe in Christ, but then you put yourself back into bondage thinking, “but now I must obey all of Christ’s commandments or I could lose my salvation.” That’s a lie. You’re not believing the Gospel. You are not standing fast in the liberty wherewith Christ has made us free. I find it hard to believe you can be saved in that condition. You only believe some things about Christ, but you really don’t trust and think that He has already saved you. You’ve fallen short of believing the Gospel. You believe that it’s up to you and your obedience to confirm and establish your salvation. 
 
But what did Paul tell the Corinthians?

“…waiting for the coming of our Lord Jesus Christ: Who shall also confirm you unto the end, that ye may be blameless in the day of our Lord Jesus Christ.” (1 Corinthians 1:7-8 KJV)

Who is the One who confirms us and establishes us so that we are blameless? Is it you and your obedience?
 
We don’t confirm or establish ourselves through our own obedience. Jesus confirms and establishes us to the end. Our obedience plays no role in our salvation. In discipleship yes, but not salvation. As disciples, we are called to walk in obedience. God will bless us if we do and discipline us if we don’t. But that has nothing to do with salvation, which is by God’s grace through faith in Christ alone.
 
So, the bottom line from these three things from Paul is this:
 
ARE YOU SAVED? Have you been forever washed of your sin, sanctified, justified in Christ and by the Holy Spirit?
 
ARE YOU LIVING FOR CHRIST? In your freedom, are you honoring God with your life, not giving yourself over to sin?
 
Folks, it’s getting very late on God’s timeline. The time God has given for people to turn to Him to be saved is almost up. Judgment is coming. All of us will stand before God. Those who are saved will stand at the Judgment seat of Christ, where how you lived as a Christian will be judged. Did you bear fruit for God, or did you waste your life, indulging in sin? No one will lose salvation at the Judgment Seat of Christ, but you can lose rewards for not having lived faithfully. So, live for Christ now while you can.
 
And then all others who are not saved will appear before God at the Great White Throne Judgment, where they will be separated from God to a place of punishment forever. No one has to go there. God doesn’t want you to go there. He’s provided one and only one way of escaping that terrible fate: It’s by believing the Gospel, that 

Salvation = God’s Grace Alone Through Faith Alone In Christ Alone

Believing the Gospel means placing your entire trust in Christ for your salvation, believing that He:

  1. Died for our sins
  2. Was buried 
  3. Rose from the dead

As it says in 1 Corinthians 15:1-4.

Nothing more. Nothing less. There are no other requirements to be saved than to believe in Jesus. Once you place your faith in Christ for your salvation, you are born again, and you are forever a child of God. Our Father is a good Father Who will never abandon you but will preserve you in the faith and never let you go. 

If you are not certain about your salvation, time is getting very late. Don’t take the chance of missing out on God. 

Making Sure You Are Saved Is As Easy As ABC

Admit to God that you have sinned.

Believe that Jesus, God’s Son, died to pay for
your sins 100%, was buried and rose from the dead.

Call upon Jesus and ask Him to forgive you and save you.

If you make that decision to call upon Him, God gives you this assurance:

“For whosoever shall call upon the Name of the Lord shall be saved.” (Romans 10:13 KJV)

Thank you for watching.


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